Service Journalsim

WEDNESDAY,  SEPT 2, 2020    (Vol. 2  No. 13)
Service Journalism Image
(Nieman Lab)
Once you start looking for it, you see service journalism everywhere.

Tips on how to make face masks fit better, reading lists to learn about institutional racism, advice to help a friend deal with anxiety. Forces on both sides of the news producer/consumer equation are driving this uptick: these stories, broadly defined as those that offer actionable advice, are relatively easy to report remotely.

They’re also in demand among consumers who are looking for guidance on everything from finances to mental health to dinner ideas. This shift toward reporting that helps people not just learn but do something predates the Covid-19 pandemic, but at a time when many have questions, service journalism provides answers.
JOURNALISM EDUCATION NEWS
(Tri- States Public Radio)
A piece on the RTDNA’s website says local TV news might never be the same due to the coronavirus pandemic.  It notes, among other things, the innovation required to produce stories while working remotely.
The Shop Talk panelists use that as the starting point for their discussion about how the pandemic is changing the way journalism is taught.
STUDENT POSTS
High School
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Community College
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University
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Look for more links to student stories at the Online Elsewhere Facebook page. Trying something new with your program? Something interesting happen? Let me know at richcamron@gmail.com (cameron without the “e”). 
 
Copyright 2020 by Rich Cameron

Saving California Journalism Act

TUESDAY,  SEPT. 1, 2020    (Vol. 2  No. 12)
(California News Publishers Assn)
Assemblywoman Blanca Rubio (D- Baldwin Park) today announced that her Assembly Bill 323, the Save Local Journalism Act, was passed by the State Senate and State Assembly and is on its way to the Governor’s desk.
AB 323 establishes a path for community and ethnic news outlets to reach underserved communities through state advertising and provides an additional year for ethnic, mid-size and daily newspapers to pursue alternate distribution models while preparing to comply with AB 5.
JOURNALISM EDUCATION NEWS
(Drexel University Triangle)
As a Drexel student, many things are guaranteed throughout your college experience as a Dragon. One assured fixture in Drexel University’s existence is the weekly tradition of being heckled and hounded at the Mario the Dragon statue — often unexpectedly — by a member of the reigning student newspaper on campus, The Triangle.
Why? Well, to get a copy of the new issue of The Triangle, of course! All jokes aside, it is equally awkward for both the members of The Triangle and for the passersby alike, but it is also an integral — albeit quirky — part of the Drexel campus culture.
The Editorial Staff at The Triangle has been figuring out what it means to be a newspaper — especially one such as ours, well-recognized for its in-person distribution and accessibility — and how to keep people reading. We can continue to improve our digital footprint, expand our social media outreach and produce content that is truly impactful for the Drexel community.
– – – –
(CampusReform)
Stanford University’s student paper published a letter advocating for its illegal immigrant student population
Stanford University’s student newspaper, The Stanford Daily, promoted a petition supporting illegal immigrant students. In the “letter to the community,” titled, “Undocumented students are hurting,” four students shared their experiences, each under a pseudonym, of being in the country illegally.
The letter included a petition in support of illegal immigrant communities since the new restrictions to the Obama-era program, DACA. Some of the demands listed in the petition include increasing funding and resources for hiring “professionals of color who are better trained” on working for illegal immigrant students, as well as creating a task force to train faculty to better support the community.
STUDENT POSTS 
High School
(Sequoias HS – Redwood City)
Virtual graduation better than nothing
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Community College
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University
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NEW ON ISSUU (community college)
Cypress Chronicle   (Vol. Fall 2020  No. 1)
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Look for more links to student stories at the Online Elsewhere Facebook page. Trying something new with your program? Something interesting happen? Let me know at richcamron@gmail.com (cameron without the “e”). 
 
Copyright 2020 by Rich Cameron

Remotely prepared print newspaper

FRIDAY,  AUG. 28, 2020    (Vol. 2  No. 11)

women looking at print student newspaper

(TribLive)
The Pitt News released its first print edition of the academic year on Wednesday, keeping alive a 110-year-old Pitt tradition.
But things at The Pitt News were far from normal.
Jon Moss, the student newspaper’s editor-in-chief, and Mary Rose O’Donnell, the managing editor, weren’t in the newsroom as they worked on the paper’s layout Tuesday night. Moss was in New Jersey. O’Donnell was in an Oakland apartment. The rest of the newsroom was scattered throughout dorms, apartments, and family homes.
The staff — made up of between 150 and 200 students — is working remotely, as covid-19 restrictions have shuttered their office.
Nonetheless, The Pitt News released its first issue of the year on schedule.
TEACHING TIPS
(Student Press Law Center)
As student journalists prepare for reporting this semester in the midst of major uncertainty surrounding COVID-19, many are wondering what policies to institute concerning in-person reporting. Below you’ll find suggested language crafted by the SPLC to guide you should you decide to implement newsroom policies regarding how staff members and contributors conduct their reporting.
– – –
(Poynter Institute: The Lead)
The journalism job market is tenuous. Many internship programs are on hold. What’s a job-searching, early career journalist to do? Freelancing is one option, but it’s intimidating if you don’t know how to get started.
Erin Schwartz is the managing editor of Study Hall, a media newsletter and online support network with great resources for freelance journalists. She shared advice on finding paid work, negotiating rates and building relationships with editors.
STUDENT POSTS (see more here
High School
(Menlo (Atherton) HS)
Behind the Mask: Series Cover
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University
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Look for more links to student stories at the Online Elsewhere Facebook page. Trying something new with your program? Something interesting happen? Let me know at richcamron@gmail.com (cameron without the “e”). 
 
Copyright 2020 by Rich Cameron

Student media sound the alarm

THURSDAY,  AUG. 27, 2020    (Vol. 2  No. 10)
Alarm on stack of newspapers
(Axios)
College media outlets are calling out their universities for failing to address the potentially-devastating communal spread of COVID-19 in their college towns.
Why it matters: With local newspapers in decline, campus papers have increasingly become the default for how students and community members get their news.
The big picture: Media reports and viral videos have pinpointed parties and social gatherings as the main culprit of cases across campuses so far, a problem students say universities should have prepared for. Instead, the schools are blaming the students.
JOURNALISM EDUCATION NEWS
(WPSD Paducah, KY)
College campuses across the U-S are forced to make changes just days after starting classes because of a spike in COVID-19 cases.
News about infections and students not following guidelines are highlighted by student journalists on campus.

The college campus, University of Tennessee-Martin, is fairly empty because students are doing hybrid learning. Despite this, student journalists are keeping content on the airwaves of the college radio station WUTM-FM.

“We’ve all risen to the occasion,” said Kayla brooks, program director of WUTM. “There was no one here who was like, ‘do I really have to come back to work’, everyone was eager to come back and ready to keep reporting and ready to keep WUTM on air.”

How students are going through this pandemic directly impacts the local community. The student newspaper made a special pandemic paper for campus.

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(KUT Austin NPR)
“Protect Texas Together” is UT Austin’s comprehensive plan to operate safely while the coronavirus pandemic continues. But after seeing other universities open for the fall and then shut down because of coronavirus cases, some students say they don’t feel very protected.
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Notre Dame University and Michigan State University are among the schools that returned to virtual classes after spikes in COVID-19 cases led them to abandon plans for in-person classes. At Texas A&M University, officials are reporting more than 400 coronavirus cases within two weeks of students returning to campus.
(NPR)
On the morning of Friday, Aug. 14, The Daily Tar Heel newsroom got a tip: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was about to announce clusters of positive coronavirus cases in student housing, after only a week of in-person classes. The student-led independent newspaper broke the news before the university sent its campus-wide alert.
Over the weekend, more news of clusters trickled in — this time at a fraternity house and another dorm.
On Sunday, Editor-in-chief Anna Pogarcic says, the opinion editor decided to scrap the planned Monday editorial, and pivot to address the rapidly devolving reopening plan the university had been touting all summer. After a late-night power outage, Monday’s issue barely made it to the printer in time.
Student journalists, like those at The Daily Tar Heel, have been tirelessly reporting on college reopening plans — and their editorials haven’t held back.
STUDENT POSTS
(see more here
High School
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Community College
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University
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Look for more links to student stories at the Online Elsewhere Facebook page. Trying something new with your program? Something interesting happen? Let me know at richcamron@gmail.com (cameron without the “e”). 
Copyright 2020 by Rich Cameron

SEC front page goes viral

WEDNESDAY,  AUG. 26, 2020    (Vol. 2  No. 9)
(College Spun)
An SEC school’s student newspaper cover about the start of the academic year is going viral on social media on Sunday night.
The University of Mississippi is scheduled to begin its fall semester on Monday. Ole Miss had its first full day of classes on Monday.
Is the SEC university ready to start the year in the middle of a global pandemic?
Ole Miss’ student newspaper, The Daily Mississippian, attempted to answer that question on the front page of this week’s issue.
JOURNALISM EDUCATION NEWS
(Poynter Institute – The Lead)
University administrators and independent student journalists often don’t get along. Because private universities are not necessarily subject to open records laws, often the only way to get information about the university is to ask— leaving the fate of student journalists in the hands of media relations specialists who can be uncooperative. And when a university refuses to work with its student newspaper, the entire university community is harmed.
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(Reynolds Journalism Institute)
Newsrooms in the U.S. have the opportunity to pair up with journalism students from across the country to find new ways to engage with readers during the 14th annual RJI Student Innovation Competition.
Each year the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute at the Missouri School of Journalism issues a challenge to college students to develop a product or service to help solve a journalism challenge. This year’s goal is to help newsrooms reconnect with audiences during a season of isolation.
“We thought that helping newsrooms find new and creative ways to engage with their communities was a timely and important challenge,” says Kat Duncan, interim director of innovation at RJI. “We are sure that the students will come up with amazing ideas, which will be beneficial to newsrooms all over the country.”
TEACHING TIPS
(Chronicle of Higher Education)
Leading an effective discussion in an online forum is a skill you can learn, much as you learned how to lead class discussions in person. A forum discussion just seems harder to oversee because it’s so unfamiliar — you probably never participated in one yourself as a student.
To that end, here are six simple ways to foster meaningful conversations in an online forum.
STUDENT POSTS
High School
Community College
University
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Look for more links to student stories at the Online Elsewhere Facebook page. Trying something new with your program? Something interesting happen? Let me know at richcamron@gmail.com (cameron without the “e”). 
Copyright 2020 by Rich Cameron

Mistreating people of color

TUESDAY,  AUG. 25, 2020    (Vol. 2  No. 8)
(Reform Austin News)
UT’s Student Newspaper Accused of Mistreating People of Color
The quest for inclusion and attention to diversity that has swept the nation this summer has made its way to the University of Texas at Austin student newspaper in the form of criticism about the mistreatment of and lack of Black, indigenous and other people of color in the newsroom.
The Daily Texan’s Diversity and Inclusion Board recently took to Twitter to announce a list of action items its members want addressed by management at the 120-year-old newspaper, including more funding for minority lead organizations, inclusion in hiring and decision-making, and proper representation of BIPOC, LGBTQ+ and students with disabilities in published stories.
“Sources in stories published by the Texan have repeatedly been misrepresented and harmed, such as describing students as ‘suffering from’ disabilities, incorrectly stating someone’s citizenship status, or LGBTQ students being outed in photographs and stories without their consent,” the board’s statement reads.
JOURNALISM EDUCATION NEWS
(Poynter Institute)
Going through boxes of keepsakes recently, I found a copy of Changing Times, a newspaper that I helped produce as part of the 1992 University of Massachusetts at Boston summer Urban Journalism Workshop.
The centerfold features 15 of us, high school minority students from across Massachusetts. We called ourselves “The Future of New England journalism.”
Here’s the thing: Journalism has always had the best of intentions. But intent does not equal change.
If you want to build a newsroom that supports and keeps journalists of color and their allies, you can’t do it with programs and committees alone. You also can’t rely solely on the ambition of people of color to find a way into the hiring pipeline. I knew I wanted to be a journalist and followed that path. But plenty of journalists never responded to my request for guidance when I was an eager student.
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(Reynolds Journalism Institute)
When I proposed my hands-on diversity training program for newsrooms, I thought getting media partners on board would be the biggest challenge. I have been pleasantly surprised at the interest and willingness to participate, but overwhelmed by the need for this project which is in even greater demand because of this seminal moment.
  • Some of the challenges:
  • Integrating diverse sources
  • Reacting instead of reporting
  • “Diverse” but not different
  • Getting past the gatekeepers
  • Convincing new sources
  • Where we go next
PROGRAM NEWS
(Facebook via Juan Gonzales)
Tune in to hear from El Tecolote’s Founder, Juan Gonzales, as we celebrate their historic 50th Anniversary Celebration honoring five decades of community bilingual journalism!
El Tecolote began as a project in a La Raza Studies class at San Francisco State University on August 24, 1970. Professor Juan Gonzales created the class as a way to channel more Latinos into journalism. At that time Latinos and other people of color were virtually invisible in the major newsrooms.

STUDENT POSTS (see more here)

High School
(Bonita Vista (Chula Vista) HS)
SUHSD rehires 77 laid off employees
Community College
University
(Cal Poly Pomona)
Zoom University or opt out
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Look for more links to student stories at the Online Elsewhere Facebook page. Trying something new with your program? Something interesting happen? Let me know at richcamron@gmail.com (cameron without the “e”). 
 
Copyright 2020 by Rich Cameron

Don’t make us write obituaries

MONDAY,  AUG. 24, 2020    (Vol. 2  No. 7)

University of Norte Dame Observer– When we learned the institutions within the tri-campus community intended to have students return for the fall semester, we experienced a variety of emotions — excitement to reunite with our friends, relief to return to the classroom following the difficulties of remote instruction and reluctance to acknowledge that the in-person semester we were promised could be taken away at a moment’s notice.

Two weeks into the semester, our worries are close to reality.

Don’t make us write a classmate’s obituary.
JOURNALISM EDUCATION NEWS
(New York Times via Meg O’Neil)
A few years ago, a college student in Georgia stood on a stool outside a campus food court to talk about his Christian faith. He spoke for 20 minutes about human frailty and the possibility of salvation when school officials told him he had to stop or face discipline.
This fall, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether the student can sue the officials for violating his First Amendment rights when they enforced a particularly severe version of the school speech codes that have become commonplace at colleges and universities around the nation. The college had designated two small patches of concrete as “free speech expression areas.”
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(Orange County Register via Meg O’Neil)
A bill that would grant the newspaper industry two extra years to meet new labor standards passed a key state Senate committee Aug. 20.
Assembly Bill 323, dubbed the “Save Local Journalism Act,” unanimously passed the Senate Appropriations Committee and advances to the Senate floor for its next vote. The bill, authored by Assemblymember Blanca Rubio, D-Baldwin Park, passed the California Senate Labor Committee on Aug. 11.
TEACHING TIPS
(Student Press Law Center)
It’s a call most editors are fielding with increasing frequency: “Pull that down from your website or I’ll sue you.” Or, “Please, please, please take that down. It’s embarrassing.” (Perhaps campus beer-guzzlingchamp Theresa is now Sister Theresa.) Must you? Should you?
Publications with an online presence are regularly facing demands to pull down articles or columns from the publication’s Web site.
Just as the Internet has made it easier to distribute information, it also has made what was once unthinkable – cutting articles out of back issues – a relatively simple process, technologically. But just because you can easily remove an electronically archived article, should you?
STUDENT POSTS (see more here)
High School
(Northwood (Irvine) HS)
Multi-sport athletes’ last resort
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Community College
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University
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Look for more links to student stories at the Online Elsewhere Facebook page. Trying something new with your program? Something interesting happen? Let me know at richcamron@gmail.com (cameron without the “e”). 
 
Copyright 2020 by Rich Cameron

Anxious media advisers

FRIDAY,  AUG. 21, 2020    (Vol. 2  No. 6)
(Student Press Law Center)
Some student media advisers are scared going into the fall semester—both for their students’ safety,
Sarah Verpooten watched as a parent at an Aug. 3 school board meeting advocated for returning to in-person classes. He was speaking into the microphone when he pulled down his mask to wipe his nose, pulled his mask back up, and continued speaking.
That meeting resulted in a “very surprising vote” to return to in-person classes for the fall semester at Lake Central High School in St. John, Indiana, where Verpooten teaches journalism classes. After watching an adult improperly wear a mask, Verpooten wondered how she would be able to enforce that her students wear masks in class.
Student media advisers around the country are struggling to prepare for the fall semester as they cope with last minute changes to their schools’ plans, insufficient safety measures, and a huge amount of uncertainty.
= = = = = = = = = = = = =

Missing “student-athlete” link
Sorry for forgetting the link to the Washington Post
article on student athletes yesterday. Here it is:

= = = = = = = = = = = = =
TEACHING TIPS
(Chronicle of Higher Education via Meg O’Neil)
On the first day of a new semester, students are forming a lasting impression not just of you as a teacher but of your course, too. Their early, thin-slice judgments are powerful enough to condition their attitudes toward the entire course, the effort they are willing to put into it, and the relationship they will have with you and their peers throughout the semester.
So that first class meeting is a big deal — and maybe even more so now as we continue to deal with a global pandemic. In a virtual classroom, you face particular challenges in fostering relationships among students in the course, and between you and your students.
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(Online Journalism Blog)
Back in 2011 in the first edition of the Online Journalism Handbook, I created a simple diagram: the journalist, reader, and another reader connected by a triangle of double-headed arrows.
The point was this: interactivity is not just about users being able to interact with the content, or journalists — it’s also about users being able to interact with each other.
When we take our teaching online the same point is worth making: interaction between students is just as important as their interaction with us as teachers.
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(Poynter News University)
Whether you’ll be teaching in-person, building your distance learning toolkit or a little of both — Poynter has the expertise and resources to make the 2020/21 school year a little easier.
Poynter has long offered e-learning in packages designed for classroom engagement. You’ll find a relevant selection of online courses like Ethics in Journalism, The Art of the Interview and Cleaning Your Copy. Most courses are about an hour long, and can be bundled  in custom orders specific to your classes at $10 per course per student.
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(UC Berkeley)
Late last night, I found myself atop Mount Sinai, startled awake by the booming voice of Zoom CEO Eric Yuan coming through the clouds. He bestowed unto me 10 divinely inspired commandments for surviving the crucible of online class. I’ve decided to share this groundbreaking doctrine with you.
STUDENT POSTS (see more here)
Community College
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University
(UC Berkeley)
(CSU Sacramento)
(CSU Fresno)
NEW ON ISSUE (Community College)
Look for more links to student stories at the Online Elsewhere Facebook page. Trying something new with your program? Something interesting happen? Let me know at richcamron@gmail.com (cameron without the “e”). 
 
Copyright 2020 by Rich Cameron

“Student-Athlete”

THURSDAY,  AUG. 20, 2020    (Vol. 2  No. 5)

(Washington Post)
The NCAA uses ‘student-athlete’ as a weapon. Some college journalists just stripped it away.

Last week, the editors of the (University of North Carolina) Tar Heel informed the world they would no longer use the heinous phrase “student-athlete.”
They pointed out that their own school had run a scam for 20 years that allowed athletes (and others) to take “paper classes,” courses that involved almost no work for students but that allowed them to remain eligible as athletes. And they noted — correctly — that the term “student-athletes” has been used for years by college administrators, coaches and (sadly) some in the media as a barrier to the notion that college athletes should be compensated for the work they do — and for the millions of dollars they help generate for their schools.
Soon after, Julie Kliegman, the copy chief at Sports Illustrated, tweeted that, following in the Daily Tar Heel’s footsteps, SI would no longer use the phrase, either.
JOURNALISM EDUCATION NEWS
(The Lead)
Across the country, many schools and conferences decided last week to pull the plug on fall sports (or postpone them to the spring). Especially at larger schools where student life in fall revolves around football, what’s a college sports section to do?
Not every collegiate conference has canceled. As of Wednesday, the SEC, the Big 12, the ACC, the Sun Belt Conference, the American Athletic Conference and Conference USA still plan to play, the Washington Post reports.
But even if your school won’t be playing sports, there are plenty of related stories to cover this fall.
– – –
(Inside Northwestern University)
(Note: The column takes a while to develop.)
The adjustment to college was one of the hardest things I ever had to do. I’m pretty sure I cried myself to sleep every night from the day I arrived on campus until Thanksgiving and almost refused to go back after the break.
I longed to find that community again in Evanston, and quite frankly, it was Northwestern athletics that brought it for me.
After Tuesday’s news of a second consecutive season without sports, I’ll have to find a new way to replace the role college football has played in my on-campus experience thus far. I know it won’t be easy, and I’ll remain optimistic for the spring, but I’m not the primary victim here.
TEACHING TIPS
(Student Press Law Center)
It has never been more important for student media to have a strong digital presence. As you cut back on print, investments must be made to ramp up your online presence — on this page you’ll find some ideas for building up your capacity and infrastructure.
STUDENT POSTS (see more here)
High School
(Monte Vista (San Ramon) HS)
COVID-19’s effects on students
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University
Look for more links to student stories at the Online Elsewhere Facebook page. Trying something new with your program? Something interesting happen? Let me know at richcamron@gmail.com (cameron without the “e”). 
 
Copyright 2020 by Rich Cameron

Student Media Finances

WEDNESDAY,  AUG. 19, 2020    (Vol. 2  No. 4)

(Student Press Law Center)
One of the top concerns facing student media is financial durability. If you haven’t yet, we recommend you start by checking out our Student Media Financial Survival Strategies page, where you’ll find ideas and tools geared specifically to high school and college journalists.
JOURNALISM EDUCATION NEWS
(Arizona Daily Widcat)
A new two-year Master of Arts degree in Bilingual Journalism has recently been unveiled by the University of Arizona’s School of Journalism, with a program start date in Fall of 2021. It will be one of the only graduate taught programs in bilingual journalism in the country, with a focus on coverage in Spanish and Portuguese languages and issues in the Latinx community.
TEACHING TIPS
(Chronicle of Higher Education via Meg O’Neil)
Your students may well be different this fall. Some may be newly awakened to societal injustices and more attuned to privilege and racism. Some may be disillusioned with a country that has admitted it can’t — or won’t — take steps to keep its people safe.
But more to the point, some students are going to be less tolerant of hot air from people in power. They’re not going defer to authority simply because it is authority.
What does that mean for you as a college instructor? . . Here are three basic steps you can take to show students they can trust you and to back up your institutionally granted authority with evidence of real leadership. . .
STUDENT POSTS (see more here)
High School
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Community College
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University
(UC Berkeley)
The end of intimacy
Look for more links to student stories at the Online Elsewhere Facebook page. Trying something new with your program? Something interesting happen? Let me know at richcamron@gmail.com (cameron without the “e”). 
 
Copyright 2020 by Rich Cameron